Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The Differentiated Math Classroom!

It's time to chime in!  



I hope you are all enjoying the book--and are thinking of little things you can do to "tweak" your instruction for next year!

I can't wait to see what you have to say about the following two questions!


Chapter 4 talks about problem solving and "good" problems.  What are the resources we can use to find good problems?  What are some "hints" for making sure ALL students can be successful at some of these higher level problems?

Chapter 5 focuses on grouping students and "flexibility".  What are some ways that you have grouped students successfully?  How do you manage this?  How do you handle students who finish work at different rates?


So step right up!  Don't be shy...share your ideas, ask your questions, reply to each other, and let's get this discussion flowing!



6 comments:

  1. I have grouped students randomly, self-selected, tolerance for behaviors of classmates, homogeneous and heterogeneous. I had some students this year with very undesirable habits and behaviors. I just had to put them with their only friend and hope for the best. While big project grouping required more careful planning, quick tasks could be shoulder or clock partner type groupings. I want to work more towards workshop next year which may end up with homogeneous groups within a unit. Students who are fast finishers have been asked to work on homework in the past. Often fast did not lead to quality with a few of my students, so a quick check with a key lead to corrections

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    1. It's tough when you have students without good group skills, isn't it?!?! So much of that needs to be explicitly taught--and it's hard to find time for that.

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  2. I do lots of different types of ways to group--my kids this past year loved "seasons" grouping. I have found that we stay focused better when we switch things up often: whole group, small group, partner. Keeps them moving and less time to be off task. With going to a 3/4 split this next year, I'm feeling the need to be more prepared with strong problem solving activities. I need some good resources!

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    1. I am with you! I am constantly shaking things up...homogeneous groups, random popsicle sticks, guided self-selected, table partners, and so on. A split class can be challenging--but good, strong problems and a structure for a workshop model might be your best bet! I would love to know what resources people are reading about math workshops. Anyone?

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  3. I have found that Teachers Pay Teachers and blogs have been the best resources for everything Common Core - especially higher order math problems. Our textbook does try, bless its heart, but Open Response problems and even deep Closed Response are just not its forte! We will be taking PARCC next year, and the official website has some higher order examples of what can be expected on it that I have used in class. I also use a book I bought at our Teacher Store called Perplexors. This can be used in Math or ELA for deductive reasoning. Students are given a story and clues and have to determine answers based on process of elimination. I have thought about taking these off the worksheet and making them into an interactive math station.
    I do a lot of "turn and talk" with partners. Students sit in groups of 4 to 6 and I have them talk with shoulder and face partners. For larger groups, I have these nifty sorting sticks that I use where everyone gets a random stick and then I group based on color, shape, or word displayed on the sticks. I ability group in small group based on what students are showing me they need help with, etc.

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  4. I have the Perplexors--I too would like to make them more interactive. Thanks for the reminder! I'm trying to get away from everything worksheet as our district is really trying to cut back on copies. I have started to laminate sheets or put them in plastic page protectors to try to eliminate some of that. I love TpT--unfortunately!! ;) It has been a life saver. I have a son on the autism spectrum which makes life very demanding at home meaning I have less time to create the things I would have in the past done on my own.

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