The Teacher Studio: Learning, Thinking, Creating
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Welcome back!  If you have been following this series of blog posts all about fractions and improving our fraction instruction and learning, I welcome you to day 3!  If you are new to the series, feel free to snoop around at POST 1 and POST 2 when you have time for more foundation information about teaching fractions.
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In my earlier post, I talked about the many factors that make fractions challenging for students.  If you missed it, you can read it by clicking RIGHT HERE.  Before my next few posts where I tackle some "in the trenches" ideas about fractions, I want to talk about an instructional strategy that is true in good math instruction across ALL topics.
Teaching fractions is challenging--but if we use a gradual release of instruction method we have the best chance of deep fraction understanding.  Perfect for third grade fractions, fourth grade fractions, fifth grade fractions, fraction unit, fraction lessons, fraction activities

If you have followed me or seen any of my webinars, you know that I wholeheartedly believe that all students can learn math at a high level--and we, as teachers, need to constantly strive to refine our teaching strategies and methods so that we reach ALL students...no matter their starting point.  This is especially true for fractions which can be one of the most challenging things we teach.  This post begins a series about fraction instruction that I hope you find helpful and meaningful.
Teaching fractions, fraction lessons, fraction lesson plans, fraction activities, common core fractions, common core math, third grade common core, fourth grade common core, equivalent fractions, fraction unit, fraction resources grade 3, grade 4, grade 5, fifth grade, fourth grade, third grade, third grade math, fourth grade math, fifth grade math
It's my day to blog over at Upper Elementary Snapshots!  Check out today's post all about teaching COMPARISON PROBLEMS...and how important it is to help students really dig deeply into their problem solving.  I hope you get some helpful tips!  Whether you call them comparison problems, tape diagrams, or strip diagrams--these problems can really helps students "make sense" of problems.

 Just click the image to take you there...
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It's coming for many of our upper elementary teachers and students.  They have thought about it.  Worried about it. 

The. Test.
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This is something that I have thought about a great deal.  I hear so many stories about teachers, schools and districts who set aside real teaching and learning to prepare for tests that are simply supposed to be a "dipstick" to measure the state of affairs in our classrooms.  I am a believer (to a degree) in some forms of standardized testing.  Districts need to get some feedback on how their students and programs are performing.  That being said, the evolution of testing into high stakes, pressure-riddled experiences for teachers and students about sends me over the edge.  Because I think this is so important, I have revisited a post I wrote last year about this time to make sure that we continue to think about what is important about testing--and the number one thing we need to remember is our students and what best practices in education really are.
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